Wheel build help

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#52
I was terrible at trying to tension via sound.

I have the TM-1. Although it is decidedly low tech compared to other meters, you can send it back for recalibration if needed. Not sure if you can calibrate the digital one on your own.
I used my kid's viola tuner for that reason, I have no sense of pitch with out some help.
 

Karate Monkey

Well-Known Member
#53
I used my kid's viola tuner for that reason, I have no sense of pitch with out some help.
The tuners have a very hard time picking up fundamentals with spokes—the sound is very 'dirty'. There's [was] a fellow on bikeforums selling old stock wheelsmith tensiometers at $50 a pop. They work great with everything but those huge aluminum spokes, provided you have a conversion chart.
 

mattybfat

The White Shadow
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#54
Just asking for a friend
How many times did you destress before you said ok? Bringing up to first tension and a ok is how Stans used to build wheels only to turn into a sloppy mess a month later.
 

Dingo

Well-Known Member
#55
Just asking for a friend
How many times did you destress before you said ok? Bringing up to first tension and a ok is how Stans used to build wheels only to turn into a sloppy mess a month later.
Yeah, that was the problem. Sloppy spokes after a few rides. Even from some well known builders.

Loc tite or linseed oil won't help.
 

Mr.Moto

Well-Known Member
#56
Just asking for a friend
How many times did you destress before you said ok? Bringing up to first tension and a ok is how Stans used to build wheels only to turn into a sloppy mess a month later.
I spend the time and do a number of the destressing techniques when I get close to tension - lay it on the floor and push on the rim with both hands going around, squeezing the parallel spokes and wrapping the crossing spokes. Also tap on all the spoke heads to set them.

I get the most pinging from pushing on the rim but that's usually the first one I do.

I think that has been key to not having wheels go out of true right out of the gate. I've rarely gone back to re-true wheels, although I guess I should check.
 

Karate Monkey

Well-Known Member
#57
I spend the time and do a number of the destressing techniques when I get close to tension - lay it on the floor and push on the rim with both hands going around, squeezing the parallel spokes and wrapping the crossing spokes. Also tap on all the spoke heads to set them.

I get the most pinging from pushing on the rim but that's usually the first one I do.

I think that has been key to not having wheels go out of true right out of the gate. I've rarely gone back to re-true wheels, although I guess I should check.
DT sells a special punch for setting spoke heads... But a 3/32 nail-set that's a bit worn works just as well.

After (outside)/during (inside elbows) loosely lacing the wheel, setting the elbows to their proper angle (over/away from the flange), following up setting the spoke heads, then paying attention to wind-up during tensioning takes care of 90% of a build--creating a serviceable, if not perfect wheel. Stressing takes care of the rest, but careful attention during the process reduces the amount of time you are pushing/pulling/prodding the wheel. 99% of the pinging you get when stressing a wheel is spokes unwinding. Building with bladed spokes is almost easy mode.